9 February 2016

Airlift

This movie seriously made me question my standards of watching a film.



Let's look at it conceptually. They took a slightly anti-hero guy, put him in a situation that is something that the world is facing right now, tense times and all, far too much adversity, yet the anti-hero becomes the unwitting hero and rises above and wins. Throw some patriotism in there, and ding-ding-ding, we have a winner!
So basically, this movie is fine. To hear about. To watch, however is a different story all together.
Akshay Kumar plays a wealthy and stereotypically offensive Punjabi businessman in Kuwait. He makes the monies and his wife makes the babies. Don't worry though, they have a maid to take care of the child.
The movie is set in the 90's, so there is a LOT of weird sexism and misogynistic values at play, that we are just mean to ignore the whole way.

Kuwait has the martial overthrow, that still has an impact to this century. The Iraqi army takes over Kuwait, but Saddam says "No killing Indians." So Akshay Kumar and Nimrat Kaur a.k.a The Worst Wife In The World are safe for the time being. Sine Akshay Kumar is rich and hence, invincible he decides to drive down the main road in the city, while sobbing and looking at the chaos around him. His window are also rolled down, and I really don't get how no one shot him even once. He meets a Major of Saddam's army, who assures him safety.
Now I seriously hope, no Iraqi ever watches this movies, because the man playing the Major is just so wrong. I genuinely think that the casting people went out in the streets,. grabbed the first guy they saw and asked, "Can you do any accent other than North Indian?" He said yes, and now we have a clearly Malyali man in a strange nasal accent playing an Iraqi man. It was so ridiculous, that at one point my poor ears over heard a hushed conversation in the theatre about why Saddam was making random South Indians his military leaders.

The first half of the film is dedicated to showing Akshay Kumar helping out about 1 and a half lakh Indians who have become refugees in Kuwait. Let it be known throughout that the movie only maybe 1000 people are shown at one time. Even things like their food, and the number of buses required for them.
Like the movie is so logically inconsistent, it is alarming. Do they think that we would all be so over bowled by the beauty of Akshay Kumar that we wont question how they somehow managed to hide food for 1 and a half lakh people for a couple days while the Iraqi army was raiding their stores?
The first half also comprises of a horrible Nimrat who literally opposes Akhay at EVERYTHING he does. And places her trust in the Malyali Major instead.

The second half sees a rapid turnabout where she randomly quotes Punjabi lyrics to Akshay claiming to never leave him.
The movie is shallow, and really quite illogically made. They seem to want us to believe that 1 and a half lakh people travelled 1092 kms in half a day. And I get that it is Kuwait and that oil is like not a big issue, but where did their petrol come from? What, they dug a hole in the desert?
There is also a super emotional scene at the end where the Jordanian airport puts up the flag of India and everyone gets teary.
But why does it do that? Like if it was the embassy or something like that, it would have still been a passable explanation. But the airport? Really?

The filming and shots aren't actually that bad. And I bet if you were the mute the monstrosity, it would actually be nice to look at. I am of course choosing to ignore the piles of terrible CGI. Nimrat Kaur is actually a good looking woman who should continue acting. She actually looks age appropriate for these Old Man Actors.
Don't watch the movie. It'll anger you. The ones who tell you otherwise have clearly forgotten the pain of the first half and gotten swept away in the badly portrayed patriotism.

The Good: Brings to light the sad plight of refugees for ignorant people.
The Bad: Makes a mockery of it and charges you money to watch it. 

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